Directory Listing For Mac

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  1. Free Local Directory Listings
  2. Internet Directory Listing
  3. File Directory Listing Software

Mac OS X doesn’t have an obvious way to view the exact text based path to a folder (otherwise known as a directory) in the finder window. You can have it show a graphical path, but getting just the text based path to a directory (for use in the Terminal for example) requires a couple of extra steps.

Yosemite users special note

Directory listing varies greatly according to the OS/platform under consideration. This is because, various Operating systems using their own internal system calls to achieve this. A solution to this problem would be to look for a library which masks this problem and portable. Unfortunately, there is no solution that works on all platforms. Connect to a directory service. Use a single set of credentials to access network resources by connecting your Mac to a directory service, such as Active Directory. How to connect to Active Directory. Give users the access they need.

Apple removed the ability to easily copy the file path in OS X Yosemite. Yosemite users must now follow a complicated procedure of creating a Service to do this simple task or take the path directly from the command line.

Residential

El Capitan - Built in file path copy function

DirectoryDirectory

If you are a El Capitan user you are in luck, Apple has now created a specific command to capture the file path. Instructions on how to use this can be found here.

Mavericks and below - How to find the Absolute Path to a folder on Mac OS X

Here are the instructions for finding the file path on Mavericks and below...

Directory Listing For Mac

The first thing to do is identify the folder you need to know the full path for. In this example it’s the “month 1″ folder of my Insanity Workout folder (and yes, I did buy Insanity, directly from Amazon actually and these are my back-ups. It’s not pirated like so much Beachbody stuff unfortunately is!):

Now we can simply press the “cmd+i” keys together to open up the “Get Info” window. This displays various bits of info about the folder as you can see below:

You can see that the Get Info window contains the line “Where:” followed by the text folder path. This is the path to the folder we have been looking for. The path to the folder is highlighted and made clearer in the screenshot below:

You can now copy this text based absolute folder path and paste it into your Terminal window. NOTE – If the directory path contains spaces, as the example i have used in this post does, you MUST use ” quotation ” marks around the path when typing it into the Terminal. The screenshot below demonstrates this:

Why might I need to know how to find the path to a folder on Mac?

Knowing the text based absolute path to a folder can be useful for a number of reasons. Being able to locate the precise path allows you to unlock the full power of the Terminal, which can often be faster and more efficient that using the Graphical User Interface.

Mac OS X doesn’t have an obvious way to view the exact text based path to a folder (otherwise known as a directory) in the finder window. You can have it show a graphical path, but getting just the text based path to a directory (for use in the Terminal for example) requires a couple of extra steps.

Yosemite users - special note

Apple removed the ability to easily copy the file path in OS X Yosemite. Yosemite users must now follow a complicated procedure of creating a Service to do this simple task or take the path directly from the command line.

El Capitan - Built in file path copy function

If you are a El Capitan user you are in luck, Apple has now created a specific command to capture the file path. Instructions on how to use this can be found at teh link below:

Free Local Directory Listings

Mavericks and below - How to find the Absolute Path to a folder on Mac OS X

Here are the instructions for finding the file path on Mavericks and below...

The first thing to do is identify the folder you need to know the full path for. In this example it’s the “month 1″ folder of my Insanity Workout folder (and yes, I did buy Insanity, directly from Amazon actually and these are my back-ups. It’s not pirated like so much Beachbody stuff unfortunately is!):

Now we can simply press the “cmd+i” keys together to open up the “Get Info” window. This displays various bits of info about the folder as you can see below:

You can see that the Get Info window contains the line “Where:” followed by the text folder path. This is the path to the folder we have been looking for. The path to the folder is highlighted and made clearer in the screenshot below:

You can now copy this text based absolute folder path and paste it into your Terminal window. NOTE – If the directory path contains spaces, as the example i have used in this post does, you MUST use ” quotation ” marks around the path when typing it into the Terminal. The screenshot below demonstrates this:

Why might I need to know how to find the path to a folder on Mac?

Knowing the text based absolute path to a folder can be useful for a number of reasons. Being able to locate the precise path allows you to unlock the full power of the Terminal, which can often be faster and more efficient that using the Graphical User Interface.

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How to fix failed to retrieve directory listing error in FileZilla FTP

Internet Directory Listing

When using FileZilla to connect to your FTP if you encounter an error like this:

Status: Resolving address of ftp.website.com
Status: Connecting to 11.22.33.44:21...
Status: Connection established, waiting for welcome message...
Status: Initializing TLS...
Status: Verifying certificate...
Status: TLS connection established.
Status: Server does not support non-ASCII characters.
Status: Connected
Status: Retrieving directory listing...
Command: PWD
Response: 257 '/' is your current location
Command: TYPE I
Response: 200 TYPE is now 8-bit binary
Command: PASV
Response: 227 Entering Passive Mode (11,22,33,44,167,111)
Command: MLSD
Error: Connection timed out
Error: Failed to retrieve directory listing

You can easily fix this error by going into the site manager and adjusting your connection details to use plain FTP. Follow these steps to fix the problem:

  1. In FileZilla, click on “File” menu and choose “Site Manager”
  2. Add the site or server you want to connect to if it’s not already in site manager.
    1. Add hostname
    2. change encryption to “only use plain FTP”
    3. Change logon type 'Normal'
    4. Enter username/password.
    5. Ok/Connect to continue

If the problem still persists, please disable your firewall then try once more! If it still fails, here is what you need to do:

  • Open Filezilla, go to Edit -> Settings
  • Click on Connection -> FTP: Choose Active
  • Click on Connection -> FTP -> Active Mode: Select 'Ask your operating system for the external IP address'
  • Click on Connection -> FTP -> Passive Mode: Choose Fall Back to Active Mode
  • Press OK.

Try connecting to your FTP again!

File Directory Listing Software

Please note: In some cases, and for reasons unknown, Filezilla just won't work. coreFTP is a nice alternative FTP client that is free for Windows and includes the FTP client features you need such as SFTP (SSH), SSL, TLS, IDN, browser integration, site to site transfers, FTP transfer resume, drag & drop support, file viewing & editing, firewall support, custom commands, FTP URL parsing, command line transfers, filters, and much, much more!